Whoa, Pure Jeevan's Back?!

2016 update: Aha, you noticed?! Welcome. Yes, we wanted to bring the site back online again, mainly because it's so packed with articles and information. It will be a work in progress for some time, as we changed web platforms and all sorts of tech stuff. So, a lot of links are hard-coded to old Wordpress-style links... just awful. But, in time we'll get all of it back in shape. For now, enjoy clicking around and reading!

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Jim here... Of the many lessons 2008 brought to our household, one standout was certainly the importance of having patience. That s because we set some lofty goals, and lofty goals are often vital teachers.

For example, imagine sitting in your living room one day and deciding: "I'm going to scale Mt. Everest."? (For the purposes of this example, imagine also that no political, administrative, or financial restrictions exist to prevent you from doing this immediately if you really wanted to -- things like passports, entry visas, transportation costs, etc.)

There would be at least two approaches to this exciting goal: First, you could simply book a plane ticket to India, find passage to the base of that mountain, and begin climbing straight to the top as fast as possible -- all within the scope of a few days. Could be exhilarating fun for the first day or so, right?

But, guess what ? You're not going to summit that mountain because you haven't prepared yourself physically, mentally, emotionally, or spiritually. When the first storm hits at base camp and you're freezing and simultaneously dealing for the first time ever with unexpected challenges like altitude sickness, you'll realize you took the wrong approach.

Quite interestingly, when it comes to major mountain climbing, you MUST take to the task *slowly*! Consider this:

"This Everest Climb will take us about 2? months from home, round-trip. It may take as long as two weeks to get from home to Base Camp as a few days are always lost somewhere over the Pacific, a few more are spent in Kathmandu buying food, sorting gear and hanging out begging for Visas at the Chinese embassy. It then should take at least five days to get overland from Kathmandu to Base Camp. It might take longer if the road is in rough shape. It can be done in less time, but that would be foolish as Base Camp is at 17,000 ft. and going there too fast will definitely get somebody sick enough to die. That is the thing about high altitude. People have to 'acclimatize' which takes a little patience." (taken from this site)

Funny that word was there -- patience. Add to that 2.5 months all of the conditioning a normal person would need to go through, as well as the financial and travel arrangements. It's easily a year-long task, if you're extremely focused and lucky.

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Before relating this back to our situation, understand that this isn t an essay against spontaneity. It s a wonderful thing to have impulses and act on them. It s just that, in *some* cases, it s advisable to temper your enthusiasm for something with a bit of serious consideration. The real wisdom is knowing the difference between times when spontaneity is your friend and when it's your enemy. You want to leap out of an airplane ? Go ahead ...but, plan first!? Guaranteed, the rush will be just as enjoyable *with* a parachute as it might have been had you given in to an impulse to leap for the sky without one.

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Looking back at 2008, embracing the goal of selling our home and moving our family cross-country is surprisingly similar in scope (to the Mt. Everest example). Early in 2008, we decided that we would like to live in a climate with abundant sunshine and clean air. But, we were rooted to our situation in many, many ways -? debt, possessions, house, jobs, even ideologies.

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Each one of those roots took time and patience to deal with. (Our home is still on the market!) Some were harder than others on all of us, and taking the time to think everything through has challenged our patience at times. But it s also given us time to plan something we re certain will be far more rewarding. We're now standing in the doorway of that airplane, ready to make the leap as soon as our home sells. We're at the highest mountain camp imaginable, awaiting the clear weather necessary for our summit attempt. We're living patiently.

I wonder how raw foodists typically deal with the issue of patience. On the one hand, a certain zen-like peace definitely descends upon you when raw, and it can feel so serene at times, you could easily imagine being the most patient person in the world.? On the other hand, when you get truly invogorated by raw foods, and really get in touch with that energy, you just want to go-go-go sometimes. So, maybe patience for the raw foodist is something different, like paradoxically the most pleasantly electrified feeling imaginable.

Original Comments

Below, we have included the original comments from this blog post. Additional comments may be made via Facebook, below.

On January 2, 2009, Moms Raw wrote:

I love your analogies here...what wisdom in recognizing the preparation needed before climbing the "mountain" ahead. Thank you for allowing us share your journey!

On January 3, 2009, Rebecca Carlson wrote:

What an exciting year you have planned. What an awesome thing to start the raw publishing train a moving! All the best to the two of you! Please keep us posted.

On January 5, 2009, debbiedoesraw wrote:

Wendi and Jim
Can't wait to see you two, what a big dream!
manifesting for you
deb xoxo

On January 5, 2009, purejeevanblog wrote:

Thanks so much, Deb! We can't wait to spend time with you!!!

Lots of love to you,

Wendi
XOXOXO

On January 6, 2009, WendiDee wrote:

Thanks, Rebecca! We've had it planned for a long time, but with so many other plans you can see how it's near impossible to bring them all to life at the same time. :-) We'll work on the publishing once we are on the road with the tour!

Lots of love to you,

Wendi
XOXOXO

On January 6, 2009, WendiDee wrote:

Angela,

Thanks so much for your comment. We tend to use a lot of analogies in our home on an almost daily basis--even KDcat uses them a lot. LOL

It so much more beautiful making these changes in our lives with so many loving friends witnessing our journeys. Thanks for being here with us!

I love you!

Wendi
XOXOXO

On January 13, 2009, debbiedoesraw wrote:

Wendi Dee! I want the free e books am I too late ?
my address is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

On January 13, 2009, purejeevanblog wrote:

Hi Deb!

No, you aren't too late! If you are here on the blog, you must have closed
out the popover for the eBooks. That's okay, though. Just sign up for our
newsletter and you'll still be given info on how to get the eBooks through
that. :-)

I can't sign you up--anti-spamming laws don't allow it. You'll have to
sign up and verify your email, yourself. Let me know if you need more
help. :-)

Lots of love to you,

Wendi
XOXOXO

On January 13, 2009, debbiedoesraw wrote:

I am signed sealed and ready for delivery!
xoxox deb ;)

On January 13, 2009, purejeevanblog wrote:

I hope you love the eBooks! I'd love to hear your thoughts about them,
once you've had time to review them!

Lots of love to you,

Wendi
XOXOXO